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African Mosaic: 50th Anniversary room

Face mask (pwo)

Chokwe artist, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Angola
Face mask (pwo)
Early 20th century
Wood, plant fiber, pigment, copper alloy
39.1 x 21.3 x 23.5 cm (15 3/8 x 8 3/8 x 9 1/4 in.)
Museum purchase, 85-15-20

In 1963, during the height of the civil rights movement, retired U.S. Foreign Service officer Warren M. Robbins (1923–2008) established the Center for Cross Cultural Understanding to “show the rich creative heritage of Africa, and to underscore the implications of this heritage in America’s quest for interracial understanding.” The following year, Robbins expanded his vision and opened the Museum of African Art. Originally housed in a Capitol Hill town house once owned by the great intellectual, abolitionist, former slave, and statesman, Frederick Douglass, the museum became part of the Smithsonian Institution in 1979 by an act of Congress and was renamed the National Museum of African. Over the course of its five decades, the museum has become home to more than 12,000 works of art that speak to both the talent and skill of diverse African artists and communities, and the unique history of this institution and the individuals who have helped to shape it.

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